Confirmation Gift Idea

The How to Book of the Mass  by Michael Dubruiel would be a great gift for a newly-confirmed Catholic.

Michael DubruielThe How-To Book of the Mass is the only book that not only provides the who, what, where, when, and why of themost time-honored tradition of the Catholic Church but also the how.

In this complete guide you get:

  • step-by-step guidelines to walk you through the Mass
  • the Biblical roots of the various parts of the Mass and the very prayers themselves
  • helpful hints and insights from the Tradition of the Church
  • aids in overcoming distractions at Mass
  • ways to make every Mass a way to grow in your relationship with Jesus

If you want to learn what the Mass means to a truly Catholic life—and share this practice with others—you can’t be without The How-To Book of the Mass.

Discover how to:

  • Bless yourself
  • Make the Sign of the Cross
  • Genuflect
  • Pray before Mass
  • Join in Singing the Opening Hymn
  • Be penitential
  • Listen to the Scriptures
  • Hear a Great Homily Everytime
  • Intercede for others
  • Be a Good Steward
  • Give Thanks to God
  • Give the Sign of Peace
  • Receive the Eucharist
  • Receive a Blessing
  • Evangelize Others
  • Get something Out of Every Mass You Attend

“Is this not the same movement as the Paschal meal of the risen Jesus with his disciples? Walking with them he explained the Scriptures to them; sitting with them at table ‘he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them.”
1347, Catechism of the Catholic Church

Find more about The How to Book of the Mass here.

Know a new Catholic?

…they might enjoy reading The How to Book of the Mass.

"Michael Dubruiel"

Draft of English Translation of Missal Completed

Completed text should be ready for implementation by Advent of O8 (although I had heard elsewhere that it would be Advent 09). From EWTN:

The International Commission on English in the Liturgy (ICEL) is releasing the draft of the English translation of the third edition of the Roman Missal to bishops in English-speaking countries today.

Known as a “Green Book” for the color of its cover, the draft translates the Latin version of the Missal that was published in 2002. The Missal is the official book used by priests to celebrate the Mass.

In a letter announcing the release, Bishop of Leeds Arthur Roche, chairman of the ICEL commission, mentioned that he had solicited comments from bishops of the various bishops’ conferences, the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments and their advisers.

Emphasizing the importance of the consultation process, Bishop Roche expressed gratitude towards those who had commented: “A wide range of issues, both theological and linguistic, have been brought to the attention of the Commission, who in response have sought to shape texts that will meet the needs of the worldwide English-speaking Catholic community,” he said.

What should we call Holy Mass according to the 1962 Missal?

Father Z wants to know, go and vote.

In Holland, They’re Inventing Their Own Mass

From Sandro Magister:

In restoring full citizenship to the ancient rite of the Mass, with the motu proprio “Summorum Pontificum,” Benedict XVI said that he wanted in part to react to the excess of “creativity” that in the new rite “frequently led to deformations of the liturgy which were hard to bear.”

In view of what happens in some areas of the Church, this creativity affects not only the liturgy, but also the very foundations of Catholic doctrine.

In Nijmegen, Holland, in the church of the Augustinian friars, each Sunday the Mass is concelebrated by a Protestant and a Catholic, with one presiding over the liturgy of the Word and the sermon, and the other over the liturgy of the Eucharist, in alternation. The Catholic is almost always a layperson, and is often a woman. For the Eucharistic prayer, the texts of the missal are passed over in favor of texts composed by the former Jesuit Huub Oosterhuis. The bread and wine are shared by all.

More..

New English Missal by Advent 2009?

Looks like that is a possibility…from CNS:

An international liturgical committee that advises the Vatican reported progress in its work on the new English translation of the Mass.

After meeting at the Vatican Sept. 2-6, the Vox Clara Committee said it hoped the English translation of the Roman Missal would be completed and approved by the end of 2009.

It was the first time a specific date had been anticipated for the completion of the lengthy project. The third edition of the Roman Missal was promulgated in Latin by Pope John Paul II in 2002, and work on the English translation began soon afterward.

A Vox Clara statement said its meeting reviewed the most recent draft translations of the Roman Missal, as produced in English by the International Commission on English in the Liturgy, or ICEL, which is preparing the translation in several sections.

A Monk Visits a Parish Church

And is shocked at what he finds. There is much in this post by Father Mark that deserves wide distribution and reflection. Because ultimately what it reveals is a loss of sense of why we go to Mass at all–and unfortunately the ones who “plan” liturgies are often the most clueless, giving such platitudes as “we are building community.” I’ve got news for you–Mass isn’t about what “we” do but what has and is being done to us not by liturgical organizers but by God.

The Mother Teresa book (mentioned in the post below) points out the real temptation that enters into the life of every person who sets out to follow Christ. Mother Teresa’s sanctity is evident because she was not overcome by those temptations, most of us aren’t so saintly and when the doubt and darkness creep in we seek to take charge and run the show ourselves. This is the great disaster that most of us have to put up with on a weekly basis when someone comes to a microphone and starts giving us instructions on what it is we are going to do today at Mass.

 God gathers us to Himself–God brings us into communion with Himself, our active participation in the Mass is all about saying “Yes” to God and being aware of our inability to say “yes” with our whole being.

Father Mark’s reflections:

1) The loss of any notion of sacred space. I think this is directly related to the removal of the Communion Rail or other effective delineation of the sanctuary of the church. Time to rally ’round the rood screen again! The Tractarians were right.

2) Mass “facing the people.” This, more than anything else, undermined and continues to undermine the faithful’s experience of the Mass as a Sacrifice offered to God in adoration, propitiation, thanksgiving, and supplication. The altar has become the big desk of the clerical CEO behind it: The Presider. It has become a stage prop for the “performing priest,” complete with The Microphone.

3) Holy Communion in the hand. I see it every time I offer Mass in a parish church: the casual approach prevails. If one receives the Holy Mysteries like ordinary bread and a sip of ordinary wine, one begins rather sooner than later, will-nilly, to think of them as mere bread and wine.

cantorganist.jpg

4) No bells. Instead of ringing a sacristy bell to announce the beginning of Mass, the organist leaned into His Microphone and said, “Let us stand to greet Father Kirby.” Sorry. That is not what the Entrance Procession is about. It is a humble, joyful, and orderly movement into the Holy Place, a crossing-over from chronos (worldly, stressful, clocked time) to kairos (the heavenly, tranquil, timeless moment of God), an entering into the adorable presence of the God who is like a consuming fire, a making-ready for the inbreaking of the Kingdom of Heaven. A bell says it better.

Same thing during the Eucharistic Prayer. People need to be warned of the imminence of the most sacred moment of the Mass, even when the Eucharistic Prayer (Canon) is prayed aloud and in the vernacular. A bell does the job quite nicely. And another thing: saying the whole Eucharistic Prayer aloud and in the vernacular does not automatically guarantee “full, conscious, and actual participation” in the Holy Sacrifice. Silence, on the other hand, at least for certain parts of the Eucharistic Prayer, effectively opens a door onto the Holy Mysteries.

4) Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion. Alas, they are not extraordinary. They are ubiquitous and, I think, superfluous. Does expediting the distribution of Holy Communion really constitute grave necessity? In the church where I offered Mass last Saturday there were four Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion, all of whom were women. Three were wearing casual slacks and one was showing cleavage. They could have been serving lemonade at the parish garden party. It was frightfully inappropriate.

Could there not be properly instituted acolytes for the service of the Holy Mysteries where such are needed? These would be adult men — few in number — suitably vested in amice, alb, and cincture and, most of all, schooled in reverence, attention, and devotion, and carefully trained for the service of the sacred liturgy.

This brings up yet another issue? Where have all the men gone? At last Saturday’s Mass, the four Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion, the Server, and one Lector were all women. I am not a misogynist. But honestly, this situation does nothing to foster priestly vocations.

5) The Music. Dare I call it that? Oh, the music! Show-tuney, trite, tired, and sickeningly sentimental with the organist/crooner singing into His Microphone. Might we not try singing the Mass itself: the Ordinary and the Propers? More than anything else celebrants must begin taking their sacerdotal obligations seriously by learning to cantillate the dialogical parts of the Mass, the orations, the Preface Dialogue and Preface, and the other elements that belong uniquely to them as priests.

I am not a gloomy person by nature, but last Saturday’s Mass left me very sad indeed. “For if in the green wood they do these things, what shall be done in the dry?” (Lk 23:31).

Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ

I have written a lot about the Mass–without ever really intending to do so. First, I wrote about the Mass in The How-To Book of the Mass: Everything You Need to Know but No One Ever Taught You–this book has done so well that I was asked to write a follow-up to it. That book How To Get The Most Out Of The Eucharist, probably should have been titled “How to Offer Your Sacrifice at Every Mass.” Then this year, A Pocket Guide to the Mass, which is part of the “A Pocket Guide” series. Each book is different and offers a slightly different way to open oneself up to the riches that are being bestowed upon us by fulfilling the Lord’s command to “Do this.” Thanks to everyone who has read any of the three and offered very positive reviews of them.

Hispanics Bring Catholicism to Its Feet

….in the United States. There is something very natural and reverent about these liturgies…something that when mimiced doesn’t work in Anglo parishes. There is a natural flow, where everyone is doing the same thing, the music is of one kind, as well as the preaching.

From the Washinton Post:

“Everyone on their feet!” cried Gladys Cardenas, a stout and fiery Puerto Rican, as a band struck up behind her. “Come on,” she shouted in Spanish. “Get ready to celebrate God!”

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