Books by Michael Dubruiel

Eucharist means…”thanksgiving”

Michael Dubruiel wrote a book to help people deepen their experience of the Mass.  He titled it, How to Get the Most Out of the Eucharist.  You can read about it here. 

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Excerpt:

The God who is above everything we can think of, who is the very reason that we live and the reason that the universe exists, humbled himself to become a part of creation. This is in direct opposition to fallen humanity that sought “to become like God” when it disobeyed God’s command in the Garden of Eden.

Our desire to be in control is part of our fallen nature. Many of us live with an illusion that we are in control. We are taught to plan for every eventuality,to insure ourselves for every possible disaster, but if we do not realize that only God is in control, we are living in a fantasy world. Think of the parable that Jesus told of the rich man (see Luke 12:16–21) who built bigger barns to store his large harvest; he was foolish, Jesus said, because he was to die that night. His material wealth could not save or help him once he was in the grave. The rich man thought he was in control of his destiny but, like every one of us, found out that he was not — God was and is.

Jesus rescues us from the chaos that life is without him. Pope John Paul II has said, “In the Eucharist our God has shown love in the extreme, overturning all those criteria of power which too often govern human relations and radically affirming the criterion of service:‘If anyone would be first, he must be last of all and servant of all’ (Mk 9:35). It is not by chance that the Gospel of John contains no account of the institution of the Eucharist,but instead relates the ‘washing of the feet’ (cf. Jn 13:1–20): by bending down to wash the feet of his disciples, Jesus explains the meaning of the Eucharist unequivocally.”6

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How to Pray the Rosary

Michael Dubruiel conceived and put together the small hardbound book, Praying the Rosary.  Click on the cover for more information.

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The Gospels show that the gaze of Mary varied depending upon the circumstances of life. So it will be with us. Each time we pick up the holy beads to recite the Rosary, our gaze at the mystery of Christ will differ depending on where we find ourselves at that moment.

Thereafter Mary’s gaze, ever filled with adoration and wonder, would never leave him. At times it would be a questioning look, as in the episode of the finding in the Temple: “Son, why have you treated us so?” (Lk 2:48); it would always be a penetrating gaze, one capable of deeply understanding Jesus, even to the point of perceiving his hidden feelings and anticipating his decisions, as at Cana (cf. Jn 2:5). At other times it would be a look of sorrow, especially beneath the Cross, where her vision would still be that of mother giving birth, for Mary not only shared the passion and death of her Son, she also received the new son given to her in the beloved disciple (cf. Jn 19:26-27). On the morning of Easter hers would be a gaze radiant with the joy of the Resurrection, and finally, on the day of Pentecost, a gaze afire with the outpouring of the Spirit (cf. Acts 1:14) [Rosarium Virginis Mariae, no. 10].


As we pray the Rosary, then, we join with Mary in contemplating Christ. With her, we remember Christ, we proclaim Him, we learn from Him, and, most importantly, as we raise our voices in prayer and our hearts in contemplation of the holy mysteries, this “compendium of the Gospel” itself, we are conformed to Him.

Michael Dubruiel

Those of us who carry the cross of Christ, who see ourselves

as pilgrims headed for that City of God, are bound to see things

very differently. We give glory to God in all things, and seek

God’s blessing upon all of our undertakings. We will not content

ourselves with some self-serving “spiritual quest” that has more

to do with love of self than love of God. We understand that

physical beauty is transitional at best. What matters most is to

become the person God created us to be; which is to be more like

Christ. So we refuse to let ourselves get caught up in some endless

cycle of trying to become someone we are not.

When Jesus told the apostles that he must suffer at the hands

of the rulers and be crucified, Peter told him that it would never

happen. Jesus said to Peter, “Get behind me Satan!” He understood

that God’s way is not our way—and yet, ultimately it is the

only way to eternal life.

The choice is yours: Which road will you choose? And who

will be your companion for the journey? Are you going to believe

those who pressure you to conform to the self-indulgent values

of the City of Man? Or will you take the higher road, bound for

the City of God?

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Books by Michael Dubruiel

How to Get the Most Out of the Eucharist by Michael Dubruiel.


GETTING THE MOST OUT OF THE EUCHARIST
If you want to get the most out of the Eucharist you have to check your “I” at the door.The “I” that wants things, that endlessly critiques the way things are done, and  that demands things be done in exactly a certain way (meaning “my way,” not God’s way). I think it was Peter Kreeft who once said that the famous song, “I Did It My Way,” sung by such great artists as Frank Sinatra and Elvis, is the national anthem of hell. The way of the world may be to do things “our way” but the way of Christ is to do things his Way.We therefore consciously have to leave “my way” at the door and in exchange take up an attitude that asks “how may we be of service to you, Lord, in this celebration of the Eucharist?”

How to Get More out of Mass by Michael Dubruiel

Eucharist means…”thanksgiving”

 

Michael Dubruiel wrote a book to help people deepen their experience of the Mass.  He titled it, How to Get the Most Out of the Eucharist.  You can read about it here. 

How to Get the Most Out of the Eucharist gives you nine concrete steps to help you join your own sacrifice to the sacrifice of Christ as you:

  • Serve: Obey the command that Jesus gave to his disciples at the first Eucharist.
  • Adore: Put aside anything that seems to rival God in importance.
  • Confess: Believe in God’s power to make up for your weaknesses.
  • Respond” Answer in gesture, word, and song in unity with the Body of Christ.
  • Incline: Listen with your whole being to the Word of God.
  • Fast: Bring your appetites and desires to the Eucharist.
  • Invite: Open yourself to an encounter with Jesus.
  • Commune: Accept the gift of Christ in the Eucharist.
  • Evangelize :Take him and share the Lord with others.

Filled with true examples, solid prayer-helps, and sound advice, How to Get the Most Out of the Eucharist shows you how to properly balance the Mass as a holy banquet with the Mass as a holy sacrifice. With its references to Scripture, quotations from the writings and prayers of the saints, and practical aids for overcoming distractions one can encounter at Mass, this book guides readers to embrace the Mass as if they were attending the Last Supper itself.

RCIA and Confession

For a brief, pointed and helpful guide,

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All of Michael Dubruiel’s books listed on Amazon.

The Power of the Cross free download and audio files.

The New Version of the Stations of the Cross link

The Epiphany of the Lord

The Epiphany of the Lord

People experience darkness in a lot of ways. Some are depressed. Others experience it in ignorance.

Darkness and the experience of being blind are two ways that the scriptures often portray the condition of humans without some outside help. Many of us are aware that something isn’t quite right with ourselves. We are not the person that we feel we could or should be. We don’t know how to act in our own best interest or the for the good of others. We often are at the mercy of those who try to manipulate our indecisiveness and lack of vision.

To this Isaiah the prophet says, “Rise up in splendor, Jerusalem! Your light has come, the glory of the Lord shines upon you. See, darkness covers the earth,

and thick clouds cover the peoples; but upon you the LORD shines, and over you appears his glory. Nations shall walk by your light, and kings by your shining radiance”. God has sent light that shines in the darkness, John tells us in his gospel–will we accept that light?

The magi traveled afar to experience it. How far are we willing to travel to experience what countless saints have experienced for the last two thousand years? How willing are we to surrender to the light? It is our choice, we can be like Herod who was threatened by the light that his true worth would be seen in its light or we can be like the magi who recognized the ultimate worth of such light shining in the darkness and brought what they had to offer in exchange for a treasure that the earth can only give in the person of the God made man.

More from Michael Dubruiel