Padre Pio – September 23

Padre Pio…

From the Canonization Homily by Pope John Paul II:

“But may I never boast except in the cross of Our Lord Jesus Christ” (Gal 6,14).

Is it not, precisely, the “glory of the Cross” that shines above all in Padre Pio? How timely is the spirituality of the Cross lived by the humble Capuchin of Pietrelcina. Our time needs to rediscover the value of the Cross in order to open the heart to hope.

Throughout his life, he always sought greater conformity with the Crucified, since he was very conscious of having been called to collaborate in a special way in the work of redemption. His holiness cannot be understood without this constant reference to the Cross.

In God’s plan, the Cross constitutes the true instrument of salvation for the whole of humanity and the way clearly offered by the Lord to those who wish to follow him (cf. Mk 16,24). The Holy Franciscan of the Gargano understood this well, when on the Feast of the Assumption in 1914, he wrote: “In order to succeed in reaching our ultimate end we must follow the divine Head, who does not wish to lead the chosen soul on any way other than the one he followed; by that, I say, of abnegation and the Cross” (Epistolario II, p. 155).

-Michael Dubruiel 

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73 Steps to Spiritual Communion with God 65 by Michael Dubruiel

This is a continuation of the 73 Steps to Spiritual Communion with God by Michael Dubruiel. The previous entries are found in the archive to the right.

(65) To hate no one.

Christianity introduced a radical concept into the world that has seldom been lived out–to love everyone as God loves him or her. Our Lord counseled his disciples to “love their enemies” and to “love one’s neighbor.” When asked by one of His hearers who their neighbor was, Jesus used the example of what undoubtedly would have been the questioners idea of an enemy–a Samaritan as the good who was “neighbor” to the unfortunate fallen soul along the roadside.

Benedict’s maxim almost takes this a step further in counseling us in the first place to “hate no one.” This may seem impossible to do but only if we are convinced that we ourselves have been set up as the supreme judge over all people. Every person that we might “hate” is an invitation for us to turn to God again and to acknowledge that God alone knows what His designs have for both the person and us in question.

We should pray for those who abuse and mistreat us. We are to try to understand those who “hate” us. Hatred by its very nature is evil.

The example that usually drives the point home is to imagine that the person in question is your child. Could you hate your own flesh? Would you not wish for their salvation? If they are doing wrong would you not do everything in your power to help them to do right so that they might be saved?

In the Kingdom of God we are all brothers and sisters, God’s children.

The genius of St. Benedict’s counsel is that it does not play the game of saying that you can love someone but not like them–which I have always found rather ridiculous. We are to hate no one and to see “hate” as an obstacle to love.

73 Steps to Spiritual Communion with God – 64

This is a continuation of the 73 Steps to Spiritual Communion with God by Michael DubruielThe previous entries are found in the archive to the right.

(64) To love chastity.

St. Benedict’s counsel to “love” chastity applies to every Christian regardless of their state of life. The monk will be chaste in a way that is different than a married person but both are required to be chaste in their dealings with all people. Chastity is an attitude toward the other that sees the beauty of the person but does not wish to take or consume the other.

Being chaste means never making an object of anyone. While we think of this in sexual terms, sex is really just the tip of the iceberg. Seeing a person as a person and not making an object of them helps us to truly be reverent toward the person. Being chaste means being open to seeing others as God sees them. We desire to be in a good relationship with all people but we do not seek to enslave the other.

Some were shocked some years ago when Pope John Paul II stated that even a married man could commit a sin of lust with his own wife. What the Pope was pointing out was that even marriage does not give a man or woman the license to treat the their spouse like their property. In the same way we are called to treat all with respect.

In Latin this counsel is made up of two words, “love” and “chastity.” In reality the two are equal. We are called to love all people chastely, in imitation of God who loves all of His creation.

73 Steps to Communion with God by Michael Dubruiel – 63

This is a continuation of the 73 Steps to Communion with God by Michael Dubruiel. The previous steps appear throughout the Archives, available to the right. This is the 63rd step:

(63) To fulfil daily the commandments of God by works.

Most of us think of the commandments as “something” not to do, but this is not Benedict’s take. He sees them as something that requires action on our part daily. The type of action required is either to “fight” against the urges that keep us from fulfilling God’s commands or to “flee” the devil as we run toward God.

Fighting or fleeing are the actions demanded of the disciple of Christ. Most of us may find that we are moved to do neither. It could be that in our complacent lifestyle that following God’s commandments doesn’t seem to ask much of us. We peer out of the windows of our house or car and see the world outside of our selves and are quite unmoved by the plight of those who live down the street or in another neighborhood. We somehow listen to the Gospels and confuse Jesus with someone who “didn’t care” and wouldn’t have lifted a finger to help anyone.

If this definition hits close to home, then you know what you must “fight” in order to fulfill God’s commands daily–indifference. If on the other hand this definition makes you angry and you don’t like the mean guy saying that perhaps you aren’t a “good” Christian after all, then you need to flee the devil who has taken hold of your life (coming no doubt as an angel of light) and run to God who will empower you to fulfill His commands.

This counsel is against complacency. It is against thinking that we have ever arrived and now all we need to do is sit back and relax. It is a warning against the riches that can blind us to the truth of the Gospel which can neither be lost by the gnawing of a moth or the rot of rust. Works are demanded of us daily in order that God’s will might be done on earth as it is in Heaven.

St. Januarius – September 19

Feast of St. Januarius

A sealed glass vial containing a dark unknown substance, allegedly the clotted blood of San Gennaro (St Januarius), is shown several times a year to a packed crowd in the Cathedral of Napoli (Naples). Whilst the container is being handled during a solemn ceremony, the solid mass suddenly liquefies before everybody’s eyes. [1, 2]

This well-documented phenomenon is still regarded as unexplained [3] by believers and sceptics alike. Noted parapsychologist Hans Bender defined it the paranormal phenomenon with the best and historical documentation; [4] physicist Enrico Fermi seems to have expressed interest as well.

It is also one of the few recurrent non-medical, physical “miracles” that might be studied scientifically.

Above from CICAP, the Italian Committee for the Investigation of Claims on the Paranormal

-Michael Dubruiel

Our Lady of Sorrows – September 15

In northern Ohio there is a church dedicated to Our Lady

of Sorrows; in the basement is a room containing signs of

weakness that have been left behind by those who have experienced

the power of God at that shrine. Among whiskey bottles,

cigarettes, crutches, and leg braces is a mat that once

carried a paralyzed man there—who left empowered by God

to walk again.

I suspect that the most powerful stories of healing, however,

come from those who were unable to leave anything behind.

Their weakness, whatever it was, remained with them; however,

they had been empowered to carry their weakness in the power

of God. This type of healing often goes unnoticed. Even so, it is

the greater healing, because it enables us to share in the cross of

Christ, to embrace our weakness in the power of God. For the

follower of Christ, weakness need not mean defeat!

"michael dubruiel"

Exaltation of the Holy Cross – September 14

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Here’s a link to a page with a free download of Michael Dubruiel’s book The Power of the Cross.

It’s in .pdf format.

Also on the page is a link to a series of interviews Michael did with Catholic radio station KVSS on the book.

St. Francis of Assisi taught his followers to reverence Christ and

his cross wherever they might find themselves. The prayer attributed

to St. Francis that begins, “Lord, make me a channel of your

peace,” was in fact not composed by St. Francis; it was misapplied

to him in a prayer book. The true prayer of St. Francis was one

he taught his friars to pray whenever they would pass a Church

or the sign of the cross made by two branches in a tree. They were

to prostrate themselves toward the church or the cross and pray,

“We adore you Christ and we praise you present here and in all

the Churches throughout the world, because by your holy cross

you have redeemed the world.”

The cross reminds us of the true Christ, the one in the

Gospels who was constantly misjudged by the religious figures

of his day. If we are not careful, he will be misjudged by us as well.

We need to worship him alone.

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